Best New Rock – West Wickhams, Sergio Napoletano, Deleo, Echo Coast

West Wickhams caught our attention with their new release Consider Her Way.  The innovative 5 song EP is indie rock with post punk sensibility.  At times bizarre and chaotic, the merry psychedelic pair of Jon Othello and Elle Flores love to tease and jest.  Their sound is somewhere between the quirky misunderstood intelligent rock of Devo and the unconventional dance rock of LCD Soundsystem.  Clearly rooted in Punks art movement, it recalls Television and early Talking Heads.  

West Wickhams flash glimpses of conventionality like on chord heavy The Zap Gun, before obliterating expectations on tracks like Turning Into Someone Else and Les Mepris (Underwater).  Constantly changing and tweaking their stylistic affect, they still manage to stay within a prescribed ethos.  Its a reflection of the consistent tonal palette and the scattered vocal parts.  With urban swagger the vocals have a hint of Public Image Ltd or the Streets, with scattered melodies in the spirit of underground washed out new wave.  Altogether the EP could appeal to fans of post punk and shoegaze alike, as there is a dreamy underlayer to the sonic design.  

The lyrical cadence is most notably what grabs you and keeps Consider Her Way memorable.  Catchy lines like “This Circus Is Over” are hypnotic in their repetition.  Lyrical mementos that get stuck in your head like a keepsake to bring you back again, a calling card that helps bands break through the noise. 

Enjoy This Circus Is Over now on our Best New Rock Playlist.

Sergio Napoletano

Sergio Napoletano remembers rock in all its glory on his new EP Memory Aisle.  The opening track Lockjaw kicks off with fierce execution.  The energetic performance is raw and revealing, with a touch of garage rock sensibility.  It should draw comparisons to indie revivalist rockers like Delta Spirit, Strand of Oaks, and Okkervil River.  

The 2nd track, Kids In The Hall bates you with its acoustic opening before quickly picking up where the first track left off.  Sergio’s rhythm guitar work is about unfiltered playing, he slashes away at the six string, conducting a marathon with every performance.  With a scratchy vocal draw it connects with releases by Phosphorescent and early Kings of Leon.  

The title track, with its expressive acoustic guitar playing, recalls acoustic first releases by artists like Kurt Vile and Deer Hunter.  As the track picks up, Sergio exemplifies the spirit of the indie underground rock scene.  

Following up with the emotive Downtown and Petty Folks, Sergio solidifies his status as a new indie rock gem.  Fans of the aforementioned bands as well as recent breakouts like the War On Drugs and Phoebe Bridges should relish in the new classic indie sound.  Every song hits a little different, but it’s all authentic Sergio.  With releases dating back to 2013, the artist is in control of his sound, and flying way too far under the radar.  A Staten Island secret that deserves more attention, Memory Aisle should help him break through.  

Enjoy Lockjaw now on our Best New Rock Playlist 

Deleo

Deleo explodes out of obscurity with their new single Satellite.  The French based band was founded by songwriter and composer Denis Navarro.  Fighting through the trials of the pandemic, the band experienced a bit of a shake up that lead to Deleo reimagined as a trio with new members Emelie on vocals and Felicien on bass.  Performing in this manner, the band embraces a solid mix of electro pop with post punk attitude.  They match the writing intellect of the Cure with the sonic intensity of The Eurythmics.  All packaged with a 90s pop sensibility, with bright tones layered thick.  The result is a punchy in your face presentation that pulls you in and never lets you down.  

  The drums on Satellite, though tempo tight feel like they’re always pushing the band forward.  Conceptually, you’re drawn into the songs momentous build, as Navarro injects drama into the musical movements with dark chord resolutions and shimmery leads.  New wave guitar tones waver with classic chorus modulation, utilized in unison with the punchy drums to hit like a timepiece placing this treasured gem in the latter lost moments toward the end of the 80s.  Updated with an indie sensibility, it connects with recent hits by The 1975 and Muse.  

Satellite is the first taste of Deleo’s new record, due out this fall. 

Get hooked on Satellite now on our Best New Rock Playlist

Echo Coast

“Guess that it’s over, the last chord is played.  And we’re getting sober, but It’s far too late.  How did we get here, nobody knows.”

Echo Coast pens an anthem for the indie rock journeyman on their new single Last Chord.  The contrast of the catchy melodic accents within a melancholy package brings retrospective vibes.  Last Chord is a jam to reminisce.  A chance to recall the good times, the bad times, and everything in-between.  There’s a slight tinge of regret, a resentment that the memories aren’t as bright as they could be from all of the mayhem that transpired in the moment.  There’s also the understanding that this is how it goes down, you can’t have it both ways.  

This indie rock jam has subtle pop punk sensibility.  In the spirit of Weezer and Death Cab For Cutie the punk reference is notable but the design leans more alternative.  There’s also a touch of the lyric first rock known to Dawes and Wilco.  

Echo Coast is the musical project of Sussex based songwriter James Hobbs.  They’ve been featured on BBC introducing and have enjoyed some well deserved radio play.  With solid execution and a pro mix, Last Chord is radio ready.  Recorded at Fort Lane Studios and produced by Rob Quickenden, its highlighted by a crisp clear design that shines through the speakers.  

Get caught on the Last Chord now on our Best New Rock Playlist 

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